Thursday, October 22, 2020

Lipid Oxidation and Quality Division member spotlight

Dr. Marc Pignitter received his PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences from the University of Graz in Austria, then was a visiting research fellow at the National Biomedical EPR Center and the Free Radical Research Center at the Department of Biophysics at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In 2018, he joined the group of Metabolomics Australia in Adelaide. Currently, he works as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Physiological Chemistry at the University of Vienna, Austria. 

He received the competitive H. P. Kaufmann-Prize 2015 of the German Society for Fat Science (DGF) and the prestigious Australia Awards–Endeavour Research Fellowship in 2018 for his outstanding achievements in the field of lipid research. 


Marc has been a pioneer in applying omics approaches with multiple mass spectrometry technologies to quantitatively detect and identify lipid oxidation products at sub-micromolar levels and then used that data to track oxidation pathways in foods and also biological effects of lipid oxidation products. 

For those unfamiliar with omics approaches, Marc determined structures of hydroperoxides and epoxides in oils and margarine that had been heated vs stored at room temperature by first isolating oxidized fractions from oils by solid-phase extraction, eliminating derivatization steps that alter oxidation products, then separating Individual oxidation products by HPLC. For product identification, ion masses of products were determined by single quad Q-TOF MS and in untargeted omics analyses, this data from heated and stored test samples was compared using XCMS online to determine peaks whose intensity increased or decreased with sample treatment. Ion masses of these marked products were then targeted in subsequent Multiple Reaction Mode [MRM(+)] analyses using triple quad MS to quantitate and identify each of the products. This multiple MS approach detected epoxides at substantially higher levels than hydroperoxides in unreacted lipids and showed that epoxides formed faster than hydroperoxides in early oxidation, providing cogent support for the importance of epoxides in lipid oxidation.

Recently, by applying genomic and metabolomic tools, Marc broke additional new ground revealing that oxidized lipids from food altered cellular phospholipid and amino acid metabolism in gastrointestinal cells, raising questions about a potential role of dietary oxidized lipids in development of inflammatory bowel diseases and other gastrointestinal pathologies. 

Marc is Chairing the 2021 Annual Meeting & Expo session Contemporary analysis of lipid oxidation products: Detecting and quantitating more products at lower levels. Feel free to contact him with papers for this session.

Pignitter papers you may find interesting:

You can also view his 2020 LOQ presentation Enhancing the Shelf Life of Flaxseed Oil by Modifying Oil Manufacturing Processes until June 2021. 

Find out more about the LOQ Division.


Canadian Section member spotlight on Marnie Newell

Get to know Marnie Newell, M.Sc. Food Technology, Faculty of Agricultural, Life and Environmental Sciences – Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Sciences, University of Alberta, AB, Canada. She is the Recipient of the 2020 AOCS Honored Student award and the Peter and Clare G. Kalustian award. This interview was conducted by Hongbing Fan, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Nutritional Sciences, University of Alberta, AB, Canada.

A brief biography: Marnie Newell’s journey began in 2003 when she was hired as a research technician at the University of Alberta, laying the foundation of her current career trajectory. She is a mother of two school-aged children who inspired her to pursue graduate education. It is her goal to become an independent researcher at a Canadian University. She is very passionate about her project and the potential impact it could have for women with breast cancer. In her Ph.D. program, she has published a review on DHA and cancer cell cycle progression, three research articles on the efficacy of DHA in conjunction with chemotherapy in two different animal models and a protocol paper detailing her final Ph.D. objective: a randomized controlled trial. She is a mentor for both undergraduate and junior graduate students in her department. She enjoys teaching and has been fortunate to take part in the 3-Minute Thesis speaking competition. On a personal note, she volunteers at the local Food Bank, with youth sports in Edmonton and at a local elementary school. In her spare time, she enjoys running and gardening.

1) Could you please introduce yourself to the CAOCS?

I am a fourth-year PhD candidate in the Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science at the University of Alberta. I am a proud mother of two kids, so if I am not in the lab, I can be found at the pool or the hockey rink!

2) Could you tell us about your current research and how you got started in this field?

I began my journey working as a lab technician in my current lab. After 10 years in this position, I made the decision to return to school and am very fortunate that I could remain in the lab that is my second home! My project focuses on breast cancer and the role of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in improving treatment outcomes. Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in females in Canada, and DHA has been shown to reduce the growth of breast cancer cells in preclinical models. Yet, the specific mechanisms of action of DHA in conjunction with chemotherapy are unclear. I have an exciting project that has run the spectrum from bench to bedside: I started in a tissue culture model and from there moved to two different animal models where we determined some of the mechanisms responsible for DHA’s anticancer effects. My final project is a clinical trial where women with newly diagnosed breast cancer are receiving DHA or a placebo throughout their chemotherapy. We predict that the DHA will have a beneficial effect on reducing markers of tumor proliferation, resulting in a beneficial immune response and improve overall patient outcomes. Stay tuned for the results!

3) You had a number of presentations in AOCS annual meetings, could you share a few tips on improving communication skills with other CAOCS student members?

I love my project and I am always excited to chat about it to anyone that will listen. My number one tip comes from that: we are all fortunate to be researching something that we are passionate about, so show your enthusiasm. No one knows your project better than you do, so take every opportunity you can to present and share your knowledge with a supportive community. Also, embrace questions from the audience; it is a great opportunity to think of your project in a different way when people ask you a variety of questions. Finally, practice, practice and more practice. I usually present to my lab group more than once before a big presentation so I can get all their feedback and suggestions. It is invaluable.

4) You have won several AOCS awards, do you have any words of wisdom for other CAOCS student members?

AOCS has been so supportive of me during my time as a student and I am very grateful for the awards I have received. I would say to any student – never get discouraged. It is a long road to the finish line, so keep applying for scholarships and awards. Every application you make will be stronger than the last, and always pay attention to the details! Start your application early and revise often. Good luck!


Articles published in AOCS Journals in 2020 by Canadian lipid scientists

The following is a selection of articles published in Lipids by Canadian scientists courtesy of AOCS' Canadian Section.

Articles published in Lipids by Canadian lipid scientists

Chamorro, R., Gonzalez, M.F., Aliaga, R., Gengler, V., Balladares, C., Barrera, C., Bascuñan, K.A., Bazinet, R.P., Valenzuela, R. Diet, Plasma, Erythrocytes, and Spermatozoa Fatty Acid Composition Changes in Young Vegan Men. (2020) Lipids, in press. 

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/lipd.12265

Kalinger, R.S., Pulsifer, I.P., Hepworth, S.R., Rowland, O. Fatty Acyl Synthetases and Thioesterases in Plant Lipid Metabolism: Diverse Functions and Biotechnological Applications. (2020) Lipids, in press. 

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/lipd.12226


Kaur, R., Myrie, S.B. Association of Dietary Phytosterols with Cardiovascular Disease Biomarkers in Humans. (2020) Lipids, in press.

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/lipd.12262

M'Hiri, I., Diaguarachchige De Silva, K.H., Duncan, R.E. Relative expression and regulation by short-term fasting of lysophosphatidic acid receptors and autotaxin in white and brown adipose tissue depots. (2020) Lipids, 55(3), 279-284.

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/lipd.12224

Newell, M., Patel, D., Goruk, S., Field, C.J. Docosahexaenoic Acid Incorporation Is Not Affected by Doxorubicin Chemotherapy in either Whole Cell or Lipid Raft Phospholipids of Breast Cancer Cells in vitro and Tumor Phospholipids in vivo. (2020) Lipids, in press. 

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/lipd.12252

Otoki, Y., Metherel, A.H., Pedersen, T., Yang, J., Hammock, B.D., Bazinet, R.P., Newman, J.W., Taha, A.Y. Acute Hypercapnia/Ischemia Alters the Esterification of Arachidonic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid Epoxide Metabolites in Rat Brain Neutral Lipids. (2020) Lipids, 55(1), 7-22.

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/lipd.12197

Pauls, S.D., Ragheb, M., Winter, T., Leng, S., Taylor, C.G., Zahradka, P., Aukema, H.M. Spleen Oxylipin and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Profiles are Altered by Dietary Source of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid and by Sex. (2020) Lipids, 55(3), 261-270. 

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/lipd.12235

Subedi, U., Jayawardhane, K.N., Pan, X., Ozga, J., Chen, G., Foroud, N.A., Singer, S.D. The Potential of Genome Editing for Improving Seed Oil Content and Fatty Acid Composition in Oilseed Crops. (2020) Lipids, in press.

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/lipd.12249

Tian, B., Sun, M., Jayawardana, K., Wu, D., Chen, G. Characterization of a PLDζ2 Homology Gene from Developing Castor Bean Endosperm. (2020) Lipids, in press. 

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/lipd.12231

Wang, L., Li, Q., Xia, Q., Shen, W., Selvaraj, G., Zou, J. On the Role of DGAT1 in Seed Glycerolipid Metabolic Network and Critical Stages of Plant Development in Arabidopsis. (2020) Lipids, in press.

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/lipd.12229


Articles published in JAOCS in 2020 by Canadian lipid scientists

Angers, P., Arul, J., Jacques, H. Cyclic Fatty Acid Monomers or the Potential Wild Card in Trans Fats. (2020) JAOCS, Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society, in press.

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/aocs.12405

Barthet, V.J., Petryk, M.W.P., Siemens, B. Rapid Nondestructive Analysis of Intact Canola Seeds Using a Handheld Near-Infrared Spectrometer. (2020) JAOCS, Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society, 97(6), 577-589.

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/aocs.12335



Ghazani, S.M., Marangoni, A.G. Novel Cocoa Butter Equivalent from Microalgal Butters

(2020) JAOCS, Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society, 97(10) 1095-1104.

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/aocs.12408

Vafaei, N., Marat, K., Eskin, M.N.A., Rempel, C.B., Jones, P.J.H., Scanlon, M.G. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: A Versatile Tool for Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of an Emulsifier Mixture of Soybean Oil. (2020) JAOCS, Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society, 97(2), 125-133.

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/aocs.12303

West, R., Rousseau, D. Tripalmitin-Driven Crystallization of Palm Oil: The Role of Shear and Dispersed Particles. (2020) JAOCS, Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society, 97(9), 989- 999.

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/aocs.12397

Yepez, X.V., Baykara, H., Xu, L., Keener, K.M. Cold Plasma Treatment of Soybean Oil with Hydrogen Gas (2020) JAOCS, Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society, in press. 

https://aocs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/aocs.12416

Find out more about the Canadian Section of AOCS.

Plant Protein and Sustainability at the Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum

The Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum will close looking at plant proteins from a sustainability perspective. Dr. B. Pam Ismail, Ph.D. is one of the many expert presenters in the session, Plant Proteins and Sustainability.

Join the live session, Plant Proteins and Sustainability, on October 23 to hear from experts and participate in the discussion how to meet the needs of our growing global population with affordable proteins that promote the wellbeing of both people and the planet. This requires building a sustainable value chain from farms to consumers. Join us to participate and learn how science and technological advances can help solve the challenges as we look at the future of plant proteins. The session on plant proteins and sustainability will highlight the importance of collaborative efforts between research, industry and government agencies to apply effective technological solutions, that include sustainable agricultural practices, crop biotechnology, processing solutions, food quality, and traceability.  


Presenter spotlight: B. Pam Ismail, Ph.D.


Professor and Director, Plant Protein Innovation Center, Dept. of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, USA

Her presentation, Developing Camelina and Pennycress as Sustainable Sources of Functional Proteinswill cover:

  • A multifaceted approach involving a concerted effort from breeders as well as food and nutrition scientists will lead to the production of pennycress and camelina lines that are viable protein sources
  • This presentation will cover the evaluation of flavor-guided protein extraction methodology for optimal quality and yield following innovative approaches
  • The presentation will highlight the protein structural and functional properties as impacted by breeding, extraction, and functionalization

Meet Dr. Ismail

1) What discoveries from your previous research inform the work you plan to discuss at the 2020 Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum? 
We have optimized extraction conditions to produce isolates with acceptable yield and purity, and with preserved structural properties and acceptable functionality in comparison to traditional protein ingredients. We are also working on characterizing flavor development during the isolation process to limit any off flavor in the final product.

2) What is the significance of the research you plan to discuss at the 2020 Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum, either for future research routes or for real-world applications? 
A breeding program that aims to successfully adapt sustainable and environmentally friendly crops as edible protein sources for food applications will use the information we are collecting. The information will also be useful for industrial production of functional proteins from such sources. 

3) Describe the biggest problem you encountered and solved during your most recent project? 
Proteins are entangled in a highly complex matrix, post oil extraction. Extraction protocol was carefully and systematically optimized to enhance yield and purity in an industry-feasible manner.

4) Share a turning point or defining moment in your work as a scientist and/or industry professional. 
A turning point in my career is when I realized the link between the basic research we do and its application. That then led me to understand how to utilize the acquired knowledge to provide a meaningful and positive impact. With the work we are doing, we aim to facilitate economic gain to the industry, address the consumer desire for nutritious and healthy food, have a positive impact on the environment by seeking and utilizing sustainable crops, provide additional protein sources for the growing population, and provide revenue to farmers and the industry.

5) What excites you about your work? 
The discoveries and developments I encounter along the way really drive me in my work. There is never a dull moment while conducting research.

6) What are potential future directions for the work you are discussing at the 2020 Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum? 
The directions are infinite. The discoveries can be applied to new protein sources. The information my work provides can lead to innovative technologies and applications.

7) What do you like to do when you are not in the lab or presenting at meetings? 
I love to spend time with my daughter, visit parks across the nation and play tennis!



This session is on October 23, but you can still register for on-demand access to the whole Forum. Find out more about the full technical program.

Sustainability of Plant, Hybrid and Meat Products: A spotlight on Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum presenter Dr. Sergiy M. Smetana

Dr. Sergiy Smetana's presentation, "Sustainability of Plant, Hybrid and Meat Products," is part of the Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum session, "Plant Proteins and Sustainability." 

This presentation's learning objectives:

  • Plant products on average have a low environmental impact. The environmental impact of plant-based products depends on level of processing. Some plant product can have a high impact
  • Hybrid products vary enormously in their environmental impacts. Not all the variants are more environmentally beneficial than meats
  • Meat products can be environmentally sustainable, however direct health impact should be taken into account
You can still register for the Forum to view this presentation's live stream on Tuesday, October 13, and join the rest of the Forum.

Meet Dr. Smetana

A brief biography: Dr. Sergiy Smetana works as a Head of Food Data Group at the German Institute of Food Technologies (DIL e.V.) since 2017. However, he joined the institute in 2013 and was responsible for sustainability assessment of food and food technologies. Before that, he worked as a Visiting Fulbright Scholar in Brook Byers Institute of Sustainable Systems (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, USA) for a year and as a Leading Engineer in the Institute of Nature Management and Environmental Problems (Ukraine) for six years. During his career, he has been responsible for environmental impact assessment of technologies (related to food, mining and landscape construction). The focus of his current activities includes sustainability assessment of alternative protein sources, innovative food processing technologies and data analysis of complex food systems.  

1) What discoveries from your previous research inform the work you plan to discuss at the Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum?

My presentation at the forum will focus on life cycle assessment, or sustainability assessment, of plant protein sources versus hybrid products. This may sound quite simple, but it happens to be not quite as simple as it initially seems.

There are a few main parts.

First, looking at the meat products and meat sources, one can see there is a great variation in their environmental impacts. Second, perhaps surprisingly, plant proteins also have varying environmental impacts. Though these products are quite well studied in isolation, their impact as a hybrid product is less understood.

For example, the consideration of biodiversity impact is quite complicated. When we combine plant and animal-based products, that analysis becomes even more complicated.

In theory, adding plants to animal-based products should reduce the environmental impact of animal-based products; however, in many cases, that is not the case, due to a variety of factors and that’s where my presentation comes into play. My presentation will cover technical options and processing to succeed at making plant and animal products that actually reduce these products’ relative environmental impact. It is not always straightforward.

2) What is the significance of the research you plan to discuss at the Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum, either for future research routes or for real-world applications?

The significance of my research connects with a few points. The first point, of course, is that as a German Institute of Food Technologists (DIL), we want to support those protein sources and those technologies which are more sustainable such as plant-based protein sources. Those products, which are more sustainable and have low environmental impact, can provide enough profit for companies and enough nutrients for consumers.

Alternative, more sustainable protein sources, in general, are a major trend in the current research. Blends and hybrid products occupy a very strong position here because their environmental impact is low, but it usually means that we have to mix protein sources to assure the functionality or find some solutions to improve their nutritional properties.

So, the first point is related to sustainability in terms of significance. The second point is related to the biomass’s technical properties, and how it can be processed. We have to ask ourselves which protein sources, plant and animal, can we mix effectively to create sustainable and nutritious products. But we also must consider the product’s taste and acceptance properties, meaning how well the consumer will accept, and eventually purchase, this new product.

Hybridizing plant and animal proteins is not novel, it is something we do often in cooking. But we are trying to take it to the next level by considering insects and microalgae as potential ingredients. In all likelihood, these will take consumers longer to accept and so media and marketing will play a crucial role in getting the public to accept these hybrid alternatives.

In sum, the goal is for our products to help consumers feel good about the product’s environmental impact and its impact on the consumer’s health. Beyond that, we also want our consumers to enjoy the flavor and thus turn to it as a viable protein alternative.

3) Describe the biggest problem you encountered and solved during your most recent project? 

The biggest problem I have encountered is a lack of precise comparable data to evaluate the environmental impact of these hybrid products.

In theory, it seems simple, if the product is half animal-based protein and half plant-based protein, to get its environmental impact, you just mix the ingredients’ impacts 50-50 and you’ve got your new product’s environmental impact, but what we have found is that is not the case. The processing of these ingredients plays a larger role and thus makes the calculation more complicated. Practical trials are key to unraveling this complexity.

Another scientific challenge I have encountered is being able to predict how these products will translate to the end product’s taste and texture before testing. A product may taste great but then result in a negative environmental impact and vice versa.

4) Share a turning point or defining moment in your work as a scientist and/or industry professional.

As a sustainability and life cycle assessment expert, the turning point in my career was when I realized that I do not know anything about anything. Scientists have certain level of myths and beliefs about data, but there are times when you put your hardcore data through your analyses and then you realize the data does not always behave the way you predicted, and your mind really shifts very rapidly.

Another turning point for me was that I realized that even knowing the basics, you and your methods are not bulletproof, and they can be challenged. But using data the right way, with the right amount of data, with the right approach, you can get very interesting results, which, of course, for me, is super interesting.

That pretty much describes the life cycle assessment process. Even after doing life cycle assessment for 10 years, I can still say that in many cases, I cannot predict what will be the outcome.

While the numbers do not lie, they don’t always translate into experience the way you expect. The struggle is the paradox, you know steak is bad for the environment, but then you see it and smell it and say well….it’s this paradox that we are trying to resolve so that you don’t have to choose between taste, texture and environmental impact.

5) What excites you about your work?

I am excited that I cannot predict the product’s experience from the numbers. What also excites me about my work is that I am always discovering and learning. You could say, I am a life cycle researcher who is always growing.

6) What are potential future directions for the work you are discussing at the Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum?

Future directions are really endless as we look forward to, from a processing perspective, what can be combined into hybrid products – for instance, can milk and insects be combined to make a new hybrid product? And what would that product’s benefits be?

We are also looking at new sources of proteins, like grass, from new plants to see which can provide new qualities to fulfill the consumer’s needs and translate them into the specific products. 

By performing life cycle assessments, we can make sure that these products also make sense from a sustainability perspective.

We are in a unique position to develop products that provide consumers a slower transition to more plant-based products. In addition to product quality, the key to this success is a matter of perception, as Beyond Burger and Impossible Foods have demonstrated for us.

7) What do you like to do when you are not in the lab or presenting at meetings?

Some of what I do outside of the lab intersects with my work in the lab. My involvement in the IFT Protein Division has led me to help organize a Battle of Proteins, where attendees try different burgers at the same time, including plant-based meat, hybrid meat analogs and more. The event would hopefully be a kind of picnic in 2021 where experts could come together and discuss the burgers, challenges that went into creating those burger products, and what directions these products could go moving forward.

So, it is kind of a professional activity, but it is also a party where people can taste, chat and network, maybe over a beer.

I also really like to travel, but that, of course, does not happen anymore, at least, this year.

Dr. Smetana's presentation is scheduled for October 23 as part of the Plant Proteins and Sustainability session.  Find out more about the full technical program.

Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Plant Proteins and Sustainability: A spotlight on session chair Dr. Baljit Ghotra

Dr. Baljit Ghotra is the chair of the Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum's final session, "Plant Proteins and Sustainability." The following is a description of tomorrow's session.

Our growing global population requires affordable proteins that promote the wellbeing of both people and the planet. This requires building a sustainable value chain from farms to consumers. Join us to participate and learn how science and technological advances can help solve the challenges as we look at the future of plant proteins. The session on plant proteins and sustainability will highlight the importance of collaborative efforts between research, industry and government agencies to apply effective technological solutions, that include sustainable agricultural practices, crop biotechnology, processing solutions, food quality, and traceability.

You can still register for the Forum to view this session's live stream. 

Meet Dr. Ghotra

A brief biography:

Baljit Ghotra is Vice President of Food Research at ADM. In this role, he oversees research planning and its execution to support ADM’s strategy to accelerate innovation and growth. Based in Decatur, Illinois, he leads and works closely with teams of researchers and scientists exploring new ways to make food delicious and nutritious. In this effort, he supports the company’s goals of becoming a leading solutions provider for customers and consumers who are seeking new products based on proteins, carbohydrates, oils and lipids, and other specialty ingredients that are applied in food, beverage, personal care, pet foods, animal nutrition and pharmaceutical industries. Prior to ADM, he spent 20+ years in industry at various positions in research and manufacturing, including positions at Cargill, Ingredion and Mondelez International. He holds a Ph.D. degree focused on grain science and technology from the University of Alberta, Canada. 

1) Why did you decide to get involved with the Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum?

We have seen the agri-food space changing at a pace we have not seen before. This is all accelerated by technology to meet evolving consumer needs, producer expectations and customer demands. Given all the disruptions that have been happening in the alternative protein industry and the needs of both the consumer and the climate, this forum feels particularly important.

To meet these needs, we needed a way to bring like-minded people together to talk about the challenges and solutions and how to turns these conversations into reality. So, it is this global cause and the increasing presence of plant proteins in the market that drew me to suggest a session on plant proteins and sustainability. I am interested in this forum as it is a unique opportunity to discuss the opportunities and confront some of the challenges of making nutritious and delicious food from plant-based proteins.

2) How does your work intersect with the session, you are chairing?

This session on plant proteins and sustainability intersects with everyone as we all have a role to play in building sustainable food systems. At ADM, we are unlocking the power of nature to provide food and nutrition to the world, not only humans but animals. It is a huge responsibility. We have been doing this for the last 118 years, transforming agricultural feedstocks like corn, wheat, soybeans, pulses/beans and other specialty crops into food, feed and specialty industrial solutions. We are keeping sustainability at the forefront as we look at the next 50 years and beyond. We are asking ourselves, what structural changes in our choices and actions are needed as we prepare to feed 9.8 billion in 2050. There will be a need for significantly more food with significantly less land. Sustainable agriculture and disruptive technologies, and our commitment to mindful actions to support the environment are imperative to make a positive impact on the planet so that the natural resources on which we depend are available in the years to come. 

While thinking about the plant proteins and sustainability session one thing that comes to my mind is the opportunity for agriculture-food processing companies, like ADM, who really connect the entire supply chain from farm to consumers.  This is a great opportunity in front of us and every one of us along the value chain has a role to play to build a sustainable food system.  

So, the speakers in the session I am chairing are going to talk about sustainability from a variety of standpoints including sustainable agriculture practices, biotechnology, alternative crops, digital transformation of food value chains, and studying the impacts of plant-based products on health and the environment. 

3) Have you attended a Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum before? If so, what have you enjoyed about previous forums? If this is your first forum, what are you most looking forward to?

The global food industry is currently undergoing an enormous transformation fueled by technological disruptions based on plant proteins and other alternative proteins.  I’ve had the opportunity to attend several of the protein and alternative protein summits in the recent past, but this is my first time attending the protein forum organized by the AOCS.  I’ve heard from colleagues that the first protein forum was very comprehensive addressing technology, quality and food safety with respect to all different types of pulses.  This year’s protein forum runs over the course of the month so attendees will have more time to digest each topic from process technologies, human nutrition, plant protein quality to pet foods and sustainable practices in plant protein production. I really look forward to the range of topics this year’s forum is able to cover.

4) If you had one piece of advice for speakers submitting their abstract for review, what would it be?

The program committee of the protein forum has attracted top experts and thought leaders from their respective fields to join us as speakers.   The abstracts and the presentations intend to showcase the latest innovations and technology in the space of plant proteins and sustainability. From these abstracts and talks, we are looking forward to hearing more about the opportunities and challenges affecting the future of plant proteins.   

5) What is one unexpected fact most people who know you would never guess?

We are first-time dog owners.  We recently adopted an adopting an Aussie-doodle puppy who we named Millie, which is one of the best decisions my family has made. It was spurred by the closure of schools and the COVID-19 pandemic in general – we found ourselves at home and unable to go anywhere. So we did what many have done during the pandemic, and we got a puppy. She was 10 weeks old when we got her, and we are in love! Millie is the best way to spend our free time. She is adorable and so full of such energy. She is a part of our family now.

 

 The Plant Proteins and Sustainability session is scheduled for October 23. Find out more about the full technical program.

Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Young Professional Common Interest Group member spotlight on Jing Zhou

Jing Zhou is a nutrition scientist at Ingredion Incorporated. She joined AOCS in 2019 and started to be actively engaged with the Young Professionals CIG in 2020. She is now the newsletter editor for YP CIG. Before joining Ingredion, Jing pursued a Ph.D. degree in Nutrition Science from Purdue University and has worked in the medical device industry for 2 years.

1) What does a typical day look like for you? 

Being a Nutrition Scientist means you are supporting not only external customers but also cross-functional internal customers. My responsibilities span across all stages of a product’s lifecycle. Emerging nutrition science developments may drive upstream innovations. During product development, nutrition literature review may be needed to determine the product’s safety and support regulatory submissions. For products that have the potential to benefit human health, nutrition scientists will design clinical research and draft manuscripts to publish scientific findings. Unlike the product development scientists who spend part of their day conducting benchwork, most of my work can be completed with a laptop and a phone. A few trips to scientific conferences or to meet external research collaborators may be needed every year. 

2) What excites you about your work?

I am very lucky to wake up every day feeling excited about the knowledge that I am going to gain. This is not a repetitive job that I will ever get bored. I am constantly following new scientific developments in the food ingredient industry. I also enjoy being the subject matter expert in nutrition science and working with cross-functional teams to ensure that the company develops safe, healthy and tasty products for customers.

3) What kind of person do you wish to be when you “grow up”?

I want to be a person who can have a conversation with anyone. Growing up in China and then studying and working in the US (where many cultures meet), I sincerely appreciate diversity. I hope that I will be conscious not to only accept the information that I believe in, but also actively seek to understand other viewpoints.

4) 2020 is filled with uncertainties and challenges, how do you calm yourself down with the chaotic surroundings?

Meditate… Think of what is important for your life. Do not be bogged down by small troubles in life. I love to travel and experience different cultures in person. This year I am stuck at home. However, this gives me time to read books that I did not have time to get to. There is a book that I would recommend to anyone who is puzzled by the chaotic world and desperately wish to find their purpose for life: Man’s Search for Meaning. It is written by a professor of Psychiatry who is also a survivor of the Holocaust. This is not a cliché book, but a book filled with the glory of humanity and wisdom, highly recommend to other fellow young professionals.

Health and Nutrition Division member spotlight on Professor Ignacio Vieitez


Prof. Dr. Ignacio Vieitez
is a Full Research Professor at the Department of Science and Food Technology, School of Chemistry, Universdad de la República (UdelaR) in Montevideo, Uruguay. He received his Ph.D. in Chemistry at the UdelaR, Uruguay. His main area of research includes new green extraction processes based on the use of compressed fluids to isolate bioactive compounds from natural sources such as food and agricultural by-products and plants. Dr. Vieitez's recent project  focused on the inhibitory effects of Cannabis flower extracts, obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) with and without modifier, on various human tumor cells and non-tumor cells. 

Dr. Vieitez has been an AOCS member since 2010 and joined H&N in 2014. He has served as a session chair for oral and poster sessions at past AOCS annual meetings and will serve again for the 2021 annual meeting. 

Read more about Dr. Vieitez in this recent interview with H&N newsletter editor, Kacie Ho. 

1) What do you love most about your job?

I like research for various reasons…mainly the opportunity to participate in different projects and the opportunity that it offers to meet new researchers and to be able to participate in groups from which you always learn. Research is constantly pushing the frontiers of knowledge. Every new project not only provides insights, answers and details, it also poses new questions. Research is challenging. Sometimes, experiments do not go as well as planned or give you unexpected results. And that is okay; in these cases, you are given the opportunity to question the process, make changes and to think beyond. Research stretches your mind It also challenges and tests you to think of new ideas, new reasons and new possibilities. Research can offer the opportunity to present your studies to colleagues at conferences, to meet other researchers like yourself and to participate in great events.

2) Describe your research/work and explain what big problem your work is trying to solve.

Antioxidants are a specific area of research by themselves because of their role in health. 

Utilization of synthetic antioxidants in foods is mostly limited because consumers are increasingly demanding additive-free or natural products. Obtaining natural antioxidants from natural sources is not an easy task since the extraction and purification processes must be developed in order to decrease the possibility of degradation. 

Our group develops new environmentally clean processes (i.e., mild conditions to avoid degradation of antioxidants) to obtain new antioxidant products using natural raw materials. Extraction of natural products with supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) has gained increasing attention from the food industries because conventional methods involve solvents that are inflammable and/or toxic and high temperatures that could degrade products of interest and produce impurities while CO2 is considered a GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) substance and the technology involved uses moderated conditions.

To help expand the discovery and utilization of new natural sources, we are developing methods to assess the antioxidant activity of new products. Agricultural food by-products can be a source of environmental problems but also a source of inexpensive raw material if high added value products can be obtained from them. Therefore, we have been working on the reutilization and optimization extraction procedures, for instance, olive oil by-products.

3) How has AOCS helped with solving challenges you encounter in your work and/or research?

AOCS has provided opportunities to meet professionals inside and outside of my research field. This has helped me to think about other applications and to be inspired by the ideas exchanged in the community. Also, AOCS membership has provided the possibility to develop new research projects in cooperation with experts in the topics.

4) Do you have any words of wisdom or suggestions for other AOCS H&N members or students who are aspiring towards their future careers?

I strongly recommend participating in various AOCS activities. My experience throughout these years has been excellent. AOCS members have the opportunity to expand their network and get connected with experts in different areas who are advancing the science of fats and oils, with a mix of professionals from industry and academia.


Monday, October 19, 2020

Relationship between Canine Diets & Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) – Pet Food Health & Nutrition at the Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum

The Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum's final week will begin looking at plant proteins in canine diets. Join the live session on October 20, Relationship between Canine Diets & Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) – Pet Food Health & Nutrition, to learn from experts and participate in the discussion on dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a polarizing issue in the pet food industry since the FDA first announced a possible link between certain pet food diets and DCM in July 2018. Additional research since the first FDA report has included research which showed that dietary-associated DCM may occur with some grain-free diets, but that the cause is likely multifactorial, resulting from a combination of dietary, metabolic, and genetic factors. A cause-and-effect relationship between DCM and grain-free diets has not been proven to date, however, there is much concern and debate among pet food formulators, veterinarians, and pet owners. This session is intended to inform AOCS and meeting attendees on the latest developments in this research area and stimulate ideas for any needed further research.


Presenter spotlight: Anna K. Shoveller, Ph.D


Associate Professor, University of Guelph, Canada

  • Understand our current knowledge on amino acid targets for canine foods and how these come together to define protein quality
  • Understand how perturbations in sulfur amino acid metabolism may contribute to DCM
  • Consider consumer trends and the role these play in the selection of grain-free foods


Meet. Dr. Shoveller


1) What discoveries from your previous research inform the work you plan to discuss at the Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum?

We had previously spent time looking at sulfur amino acid metabolism and sulfur amino acid requirements in multiple species, but most recently in the dog. Furthermore, I'm really interested in plant-based ingredients to meet some of those protein and amino acid requirements for dogs, and, hopefully, one day, cats. Obviously, the cat dilemma, with them being obligate carnivores, is going to require a lot more thought.

But in dogs, for sure, considering plant-based proteins was important. We had already started doing some of that work, for example, the sulfur amino acid work, and then the warning from the FDA in July of 2018 came down, suggesting an association between canine diets, where the grain was largely with legumes. And those diets were associated with diet dilated cardiomyopathy.

Since July of 2018, we first published a multi-author paper which I will start within my presentation and then I'm going to add the data that's not only been coming out of my laboratory but I'm also going to make mention to data that's coming out of Kansas State and Greg Aldrich’s lab and out of the University of Illinois and Maria Godoy’s Lab with regards to the inclusion of legumes in diets intended for dogs with the characteristics of those legumes and how they should be processed, how they affect digestibility, etc.

You'll also see some data about meal responses to grain-free or high legume diets, and supplements of either amino acids or micronutrients. One of the most exciting things I'm going to present is some emerging consumer data that we have in a global survey where we segregated consumers between those who are buying these “grain-free,” or high legume, dog foods and why people might be selecting those in North America, the United Kingdom, Germany and France. And then, I'm going to end off with the tremendous amount of work that needs to be done from here.

2) What is the significance of the research you plan to discuss at the Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum, either for future research routes or for real-world applications?

Well, the biggest implication and the reason why we really need to consider the role of alternative proteins, of which plant proteins are one, for dog and cat nutrition is because the human population is growing, as is the canine population. As we think about how we're going to spread ingredients across these populations, we need more food options in general. The largest part of the market is a chicken and corn-based format and we need alternatives to those ingredients.

Given the population growth, there will not be enough of these single ingredients to feed all the agricultural animals and companion animals. As the human population grows and we're dealing with the same amount of landmass, we need to innovate and diversify to meet these needs.

3) Describe the biggest problem you encountered and solved during your most recent project? 

I wouldn't say it's just my own research; I think it's the body of evidence that's building that this association with dilated cardiomyopathy and the inclusion of legumes in diet is not a simple relationship as it was first presented in 2018.

There was a really strong hypothesis that those legumes were increasing taurine excretion, which was being done through greater amounts of bile acids, particularly, what other groups have seen and we also have seen is an increase in primary bile acid excretion.

The thing is it is not altering taurine sufficiency. And so, there may be another component in legumes that may be contributing to DCM, but this is unclear and unsupported at this time. So, is that chemicals that reside? Is it an unaddressed antinutritional factor? And when I say unaddressed, I mean not reduced using processing techniques, as an example.

Or is it really kind of a multi-factorial problem, which is going to be much more difficult to tease apart? So, the biggest difficulty we've had is the key hypothesis hasn't panned out as what underpins this potential increased incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy. That's not an easy causation.

When we see something happen and its diet related, we see a pretty large portion of the population. So, a really good example would be the melamine contamination in 2007 where there was very noticeable increase in health problems, urinary tract problems in particular and a very acute increase in them, right? So, part of the problem is that we're just not reproducing this feeding high amounts of legumes. Are we using the wrong dogs? Are we in the wrong environments? Are we not combining them with something else that humans are doing in their homes because laboratory dogs are different than dogs that reside in homes?

So, so I think it's important to that we consider other factors besides diet when evaluating the health impact of grain-free foods.

The other thing is the grain-free market, which tends to have legumes in them, is huge; it's about half of the US market.

I do however believe that there are gaps in the literature because of a preference for simpler designs and not controlling variables or accounting for them in far more complicated scientific investigations. So, with a complicated matter like DCM, we need complicated designs, diverse expertise, and open collaboration. This is harder than you think to accomplish.

Doing companion animal research is very expensive. So, I own a cat colony here and manage that, but it's a lot of work.  So, to do that with dogs, which are even more expensive, I physically will have difficulty getting anybody to pay for that.

So, I was actually introduced to this musher, and what is awesome is he has, at any given point 30 to 40 fairly genetically homogeneous dogs in one spot. So, they all have a consistent environment. They have consistent genetics, and when I approached him, and said, I bet it costs a lot of money to run this kennel and he's like, yeah, it's really going to be what prevents us from growing. So, I introduced myself and said, “Hi, I'm a researcher from the University of Guelph and I would love to have access to your kennel if you'd be willing to work with me.”

And now, we've done everything from exercising work with him to basic nutrition work. Currently, we have a yeast study going on with the sled dogs and looking at gut inflammation, gut permeability and the post-meal nutrient absorption. People think that they're crazy dogs, but truthfully, they are an outstanding breed to work with. The only thing that you have to handle, is they tend to be dirty and want to jump on you a lot.

4) Share a turning point or defining moment in your work as a scientist and/or industry professional.

If you were to track, my career, I seem to have a seven-year itch. I don't generally go and look for something new, it just sort of happens to me, or is presented to me. And it just so happens that I always want the opportunity!

In 1997, I met my to-be Ph.D. Advisor. In 2003, I met an industrial scientist who ended up championing supporting me as a postdoc.

Now it was only three years after that, that the same scientist recruited me to Procter & Gamble. Seven years into working for Procter and Gamble, they were bought by the Mars Company.  I simultaneously got offered an awesome job at Mars, but I was already in the queue because I didn't know whether I was going to be offered a job or not because it was a merger and acquisition. At the time, I was already shortlisted for the position here as well.

Mars, almost, almost convinced me not to come home, well I'm not from Guelph, but mine and my husband's family all live an hour south of Guelph. So, when I had the chance to come back to where I was from, and my son was four years old at the time and about to start kindergarten the following year, it wasn’t even a choice. I mean, how can you compete with coming home?

It’s always been strange circumstances that has led me to these defining moments or turning points.

5) What excites you about your work?

Awesome collaborators. Going back and forth, being really focused on the problem, coming up with innovative ways to solve them is better done as a team than any individual can do.

I also think it really has surprised students when they asked me about choosing a career when I say, I could do a ton of things and love it. But the key is that I could be doing something I really love with completely the wrong team and hate it. So, the people I work with really matter.

6) What are potential future directions for the work you are discussing at the 2020 Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum?

So, the potential future work is that we're going to start to explore how high protein diets, micronutrient supply, legumes, and feeding management affect sulfur amino acid metabolism.

7) What do you like to do when you are not in the lab or presenting at meetings?

I would say, hanging out with my family, so, husband and 10-year-old son. In the summer, we spend a lot of time outdoors at our cottage in northern Ontario. That's a lot of fun.
I think eating and drinking socially with friends and family is pretty high on the list and then my son and I both ride horses.



This session is on October 20, but there are more high-quality sessions that are now available on-demand. Find out more about the full technical program.

Friday, October 16, 2020

October's Monthly Membership Midweek Mixer in review

AOCS hosted its first orientation to AOCS for new members in this recent Midweek Mixer. A huge thank you to AOCS member hosts Leann Barden and Steve Hill. 

Mixer highlights:

  1. An overview of AOCS, including aocs.org, inform|connect as well as a variety of AOCS communications. 
  2. A chance to get to know all who joined the Mixer. 
  3. Yixiang Wang won an AOCS glass beaker tumbler.
  4. Priscilla Costa won an AOCS flask mug.
Do you have a brilliant idea for the next Midweek Mixer? Submit your idea to bring together AOCS community members with common interests. 

Join us for the upcoming Midweek Mixers that include orientations for new members, a gathering focused on peer reviewing and one for surfactants and detergents industry professionals to network. Anyone can attend, not just AOCS members, so feel free to invite friends and colleagues and introduce them to AOCS. 

Pet Food Health & Nutrition: A spotlight on Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum session chair Elaine Krul, Ph.D.

Dr. Elaine Krul is the session chair for "Relationship between Canine Diets & Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) – Pet Food Health & Nutrition," the penultimate session of this year's Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum.  

Session description

DCM has become a polarizing issue in the pet food industry since the FDA first announced a possible link between certain pet food diets and DCM in July 2018. Additional research since the first FDA report has included research which showed that dietary-associated DCM may occur with some grain-free diets, but that the cause is likely multifactorial, resulting from a combination of dietary, metabolic, and genetic factors. A cause-and-effect relationship between DCM and grain-free diets has not been proven to date, however, there is much concern and debate among pet food formulators, veterinarians, and pet owners. This session is intended to inform AOCS and meeting attendees on the latest developments in this research area and stimulate ideas for any needed further research.

You can still register for the Forum to view this session's live stream. 

Meet Dr. Krul

A brief biography:

Elaine Krul has over 35 years of research experience in both academia and industry and is President and founder of EKSci, LLC, providing consulting services in nutrition and pharmaceutical sciences. Elaine retired from DuPont Nutrition and Health where she was a Senior Technical Fellow, leading preclinical and clinical research focused on identifying the molecular mechanisms of how food ingredients exert their nutritional and health benefits and providing scientific substantiation for health claims and regulatory documents.  Prior to joining Solae, Elaine led project teams at Pfizer developing high throughput screening assays and novel animal models to identify drug candidates and novel bioactivities of existing drugs. Elaine also led various projects at the Nutrition Sector at Monsanto, applying high-throughput cell-based screens to identify novel bioactivities in compounds isolated from a wide variety of foods that were collected from global sources and compiled into a novel food library.  Elaine has served on an Expert Panel in Nutrition for the WHO/FAO, is a Fellow of the American Heart Association and is an adjunct Research Associate Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at Washington University in St. Louis where she conducted research for 12 years on the genetics and molecular aspects contributing to cardiovascular disease risk. Elaine received her Ph.D. in Biochemistry with honours from McGill University, Montreal, Canada.                                

1) Why did you decide to get involved with the Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum?

My research at Solae/DuPont Nutrition and Health focused on soy protein – understanding how soy protein confers health benefits as well as the analytic issues of plant protein measurement and quality. This experience is very relevant to issues with plant protein in general and is of interest to me, which is why I became involved with the Forum.

2) How does your work intersect with the session, you are chairing?

My interest in and experience with cardiovascular disease research and plant protein nutrition converge in the session on possible diet-related factors that may contribute to Dilated Cardiomyopathy in dogs.

3) Have you attended a Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum before? If so, what have you enjoyed about previous forums? If this is your first forum, what are you most looking forward to?

I attended the first Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum in Toronto in 2019. I enjoyed meeting researchers all focused on expanding research around plant proteins as this becomes a more important source of sustainable protein for consumers going forward.

4) If you had one piece of advice for speakers submitting their abstract for review, what would it be?

Decide what your topline message(s) will be and make sure the data presented is clear and supports the message(s).


 The Relationship between Canine Diets & Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) – Pet Food Health & Nutrition is scheduled for October 20. Find out more about the full technical program.


Are you an industry partner looking to join the 2021 AOCS annual meeting program? Submit your commercial presentation abstract for consideration!

Fast Track session presentations at the 2021 AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo are your opportunity to present an overview of your company or a specific product to the AOCS community at the annual meeting. 

A few suggestions for presentation topics:

  • Showcase new technology
  • Research used to develop a product
  • Research developed with a product
  • Demonstrations
  • Tutorials
  • Case studies 

In Fast Track presentations, subject-matter experts deliver live presentations within the meeting program. Each two-hour session allows for six (6) companies to give 20-minute presentations – space within the Fast Track sessions is limited. 

Submit your commercial presentation abstract via CadmiumCD Abstract Scorecard for consideration.

Please include an intriguing title for your presentation and be sure to select “Commercial Presentation Abstract Submission” during the Session Type step so your abstract is routed to the correct reviewers.

The submission deadline is January 15, 2021.


Thursday, October 15, 2020

Upcoming Midweek Mixers

The Midweek Mixer calendar is filling up. Join us for the following Midweek Mixers that include orientations for new members, a gathering focused on peer reviewing and a get-together for surfactants and detergents industry professionals. Anyone can attend, not just AOCS members, so feel free to invite friends and colleagues and introduce them to AOCS. 

Do you have a brilliant idea for the next Midweek Mixer? Submit your idea to bring together AOCS community members with common interests. 



Upcoming Midweek Mixers

How peer reviewing can help you professionally

The peer-review process is an important step for improving research paper quality; however, less is known about the standardized review process. This Mixer will provide a platform for attendees to share their reviewing experiences and ask questions about how to get involved, best review practices and more. Other topics that we hope to discuss include how to balance research and reviewing and what could we learn or get from this reviewing experience. This Mixer is designed to be both an informative session on how peer reviewing can enhance your professional development and an opportunity for you to network with peers also interested in journal reviewing.

Join AOCS for a Midweek Mixer hosted by the AOCS Student Common Interest Group (SCIG) on November 2 at noon (UTC–06/Chicago, USA): https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_2QAT2slOQ_2iaYTOBhWZ1g

Monthly Membership Mixer: November

A brief demonstration will help you navigate and make the most of your AOCS member benefits. After that, you will have the chance to ask any questions you might have and network with your new community. Remember, this will be a conversation, not a webinar presentation. 

Highly regarded AOCS members and prominent volunteers will lead the discussion and be available to answer any questions you may have. 

By attending, the Monthly Membership Midweek Mixer you will be eligible to win giveaways.

Join AOCS for this Midweek Mixer to welcome new AOCS members on November 10 at 2 p.m. (UTC–06/Chicago, USA): https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_1czLJcAoRvK2Jwrwm9U01g

Mix it up: A Midweek Mixer hosted by the Surfactants and Detergents (S&D) Division

AOCS' Surfactants and Detergents Division is hosting a social gathering for S&D professionals to network and connect and learn more about how AOCS can help you grow professionally beyond technical services and annual meetings with opportunities for collaboration, business development and continuing education.

Join AOCS for a Midweek Mixer hosted by the S&D Division on November 17 at 4 p.m. (UTC–06/Chicago, USA): https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bumwd0zVTemZ5-Z-M5WUhA

Monthly Membership Mixer: December

A brief demonstration will help you navigate and make the most of your AOCS member benefits. After that, you will have the chance to ask any questions you might have and network with your new community. Remember, this will be a conversation, not a webinar presentation. 

Highly regarded AOCS members and prominent volunteers will lead the discussion and be available to answer any questions you may have. 

By attending, the Monthly Membership Midweek Mixer you will be eligible to win giveaways.

Join AOCS for this Midweek Mixer to welcome new AOCS members on December 8 at 8 a.m. (UTC–06/Chicago, USA): https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_wY7HFdTDQem8lfl3zpAyCA

Challenges in the crystallization of high oleic palm in margarines and shortening: an upcoming AOCS Webinar presented in Spanish

AOCS' Latin American Section has organized another webinar that will be presented in Spanish. This webinar will focus on palm oil-based margarine and shortening and the following is a fuller description in both Spanish and English.

Desafíos en la cristalización de palma alto oleico en margarinas y shortening

Las diferentes variedades de palma en Latinoamérica han propiciado un nuevo reto en la formulación, cristalización y manejo de las margarinas y shortenings que contienen palma. La aplicación de las recomendaciones sugeridas en este webminar ayudará a mitigar las situaciones de post - cristalización, (endurecimiento) y liberación de aceite generados durante las etapas mencionadas anteriormente.

El webinar se presentará en español.


The different varieties of palm in Latin America have created a new challenge in the formulation, crystallization and handling of margarines and shortenings that contain palm. Applying the recommendations suggested in this webinar will help to mitigate the post-crystallization, (hardening) and oil release situations generated during the stages mentioned above.

This webinar will be presented in Spanish.

October 28, 2020 | 10:00 am CDT (UTC–05/Chicago, USA) | Register for free 

Presenters include:

Andres Rumayor: (Lipids BUMA LATAM at Palsgaard Mexico) with 18 years of commercial experience in the Lipids field, traveling all over the region got a deeper knowledge of the palm oil market and large expertise in emulsifiers and crystallizers on margarine production. 

Emma Sandoval: (Lipids Applications Specialist at Palsgaard Mexico) with 12 years of technical expertise in margarine & shortenings with more than 3,000 trails at pilot plant level of a wide range of palm oil products.

Elena Dibildox: (Ph.D. in the Fats & Oils Department from UASLP Mexico) with 32 years of experience in teaching and Research at the University of San Luis Potosi with specializing in analytical technics, publications & papers on fats & oils, crystallization of different fats and its final applications.


Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Emerging Technologies for Plant Protein Quality-Based Supply Chains – Global Crops at the Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum

The Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum's second week and will look at the plant protein industry from a global perspective.

Join the live session on October 15, Emerging Technologies for Plant Protein Quality-Based Supply Chains – Global Crops, to hear from experts and participate in the discussion that will build on Tuesday’s discussion about the U.S. soy industry. This session will present assessment technologies currently in place as well as emerging technologies that are demonstrating a marked impact on protein quality improvement in a variety of crops grown globally.  Crops that will be addressed include pea, lentil, canola, fava bean and lupin and technologies span from the applications in crop production to the human digestive system.  


Presenter spotlight: Tom Warkentin, Ph.D.


Professor, Crop Development Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Canada

  • Progress on breeding pea for protein, yield, and agronomic performance
  • Progress on understanding genetic control of protein concentration and other traits in pea
  • Multi-disciplinary approach to improving pea protein concentration and quality

Meet Dr. Warkentin

1) What discoveries from your previous research inform the work you plan to discuss at the 2020 Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum?
My presentation’s title is “Breeding pea for improved protein concentration and quality.” My previous research includes published papers on quantitative trait locus and genome-wide association study analyses for multiple traits in peas, including protein concentration.

2) What is the significance of the research you plan to discuss at the 2020 Plant Protein Science and Technology Forum, either for future research routes or for real-world applications?
Developing pea varieties with increased protein concentration and quality will be beneficial for the protein fractionation industries, food companies and consumers.


3) Describe the biggest problem you encountered and solved during your most recent project? 
Crop science fieldwork is always exposed to the vagaries of weather, and researchers must be prepared and flexible.

4) What excites you about your work?
Collaborative work to address complex real-world problems excites me most about my work.

5) What do you like to do when you are not in the lab or presenting at meetings?
I love to spend time with my grandchildren. 


This session is on October 15, but there are more high-quality sessions scheduled throughout the month of October. Find out more about the full technical program.